Sweeps, nomads, quacks, and crawlers — Victorian London captured on film

Tooling around the Intertubes this week, I stumbled upon this photographic tribute to what my Seven-Year-Old calls the Olden Times — Everyday life in London in 1870, courtesy of the Mail Online.

Street vendors of everything from locksmithing to strawberries, boardman, nomads, drivers, bootblacks, flying dustmen, street musicians, beggars, and public disinfectors  — all there to give you a taste of what it was like to walk through London in the 1870s.

Clearly the most disreputable of the lot -- a down and out photographer taking photographs on the cheap on Clapham Common. (Photo: John Thompson/Bishopsgate Institute)

Clearly the most disreputable of the lot — a down and out photographer taking photographs on the cheap on Clapham Common. (Photo: John Thompson/Bishopsgate Institute)

That reminds me — I still need to read Lee Jackson’s Dust, Mud, Soot, and Soil: The Worst Jobs in Victorian England.

Oh, and Happy Halloween!

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About Shala Howell

Writer of things ranging from optical network switching white papers to genetic testing patient education materials to historical fiction set in an 1880s asylum. When I’m not scratching my head over pesky characters who refuse to do things how I want them done or dreaming of my next book (which will of course be much easier to write than the current one), my writerly self can be found blogging about life with a very curious Ten-Year-Old at Caterpickles.com, or musing about books and the writing life at BostonWriters.wordpress.com.
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